The music you're now listening to (on this page) is String Quartet in F major, Op. 74, 2nd & 3rd movement by Joseph Haydn.


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Chamber music is an intimate and fashionable musical activities among friends, originally created for performances in a room environment or palace chamber, often in a private salon with an intimate atmosphere.

However, chamber music started to migrate from the private chamber salon to the professional concert halls around late Beethoven’s era, due to the increased trend of technical difficulty.

Ironically, composers were in favour of or not in favour of chamber music for the same reason – it could not offer the texture of the sonorous orchestra sound, yet it lacked the eloquence of a solo piano music. Fortunately most composers were attracted to chamber music due to its intimate nature. Learn more about composers and their chamber music compositions. Read.

Chamber music is totally in contrast with the massive symphonic form. It is written for a small group of instruments with only one player per part. For the many who loves chamber music, the beauty of chamber music largely lies with the musical communications among the individual chamber musicians. It is highly conversational and the style of musical presentation is truly intimate. Hence, even after the migration of performing venues, chamber music continued to be a musical activity that musicians and amateurs played in the privacy of their homes.

Have you ever wonder how do the chamber musicians stick to the entire performance together without the presence of a conductor? The musicians or members of the chamber group would have to establish a common rhythm that everybody feels. One of the performers, often the first violin, would give an entrance cue and everybody would plunge in and play together.

Playing together means the rhythm and the fluency occupy an important position. Apart from having to take care of their own parts, the individual musician has to pay attention to what the other musicians are doing too. So what happens if someone in the group misses a beat or loses his way? No, they can’t stop. Instead, they would have to carry on and anticipate the next major entry or the next coming beat.

Mozart met Beethoven when the latter was a teenager. He praised Beethoven’s extraordinary talent as well as predicted his future success. However, due to some external factors, both great masters missed the opportunity to form a teacher-pupil relationship.

Mozart was a child prodigy who started to compose at the keyboard by the age of 5 while Beethoven was a musical genius who began his debut at the age of 8. In both of their short lifespans, they had composed numerous notable pieces and compositions. Possibly all their pieces, including their chamber works, are classical gems that should not be missed. This review featured two enchanting chamber music by the masters, both are in the key of A major. 

They are the charming Beethoven Cello Sonata, for piano and cello as well as Mozart Clarinet Quintet in A major. Not forgetting the elegant composition of Francis Poulenc - Sextet for Piano, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon and Horn.

Chamber music is one of the most important musical styles and musical expressions since 200 years ago. It is no wonder so many composers were attracted to the compositions of chamber music due to its intimate and revealing nature. Check out some of the famous composers and their chamber music.

A Chamber Music is a piece of music written for a group of players, (normally between 2 to 10 players), with a single instrument to a part. Classified by the number of players, chamber music is categorised into duo - two players, trio - three players, quartet – four players, quintet – five players, sextet – six players, septet – seven players, octet – eight players and nonet - nine players.

Beyond this, it is generally known as a chamber orchestra.

Here's a brief overview of the
chamber music history and Notes on Francis Poulenc's Sextet for Wind Quintet & Piano.
Also check out the
10 essential chamber music that you must know.

Check out the world famous annual BBC Promenade Concert or ‘Proms’ in London which begins on 16 July 2010. View events. Click to view a full concert listings of the BBC Proms 2010.

 

Joseph Haydn
String Quartet in F major Op. 74
(2nd & 3rd Movement)

 

Mozart was a child prodigy who started to compose at the keyboard by the age of 5 while Beethoven was a musical genius who began his debut at the age of 8. In both of their short lifespans, they had composed numerous notable pieces and compositions. Possibly all their pieces, including their chamber works, are classical gems that should not be missed.

This review featured two enchanting chamber music by the masters, both are in the key of A major.

CD Reviews:

Mozart Clarinet Quintet in A major, K581

Beethoven Cello Sonata No. 3 in A major, Op. 69


Chamber music is one of the most important musical styles and musical expressions since 200 years ago. It is no wonder so many composers were attracted to the compositions of chamber music due to its intimate and revealing nature.

Check out some of the famous composers and their chamber music.




A Chamber Music is a piece of music written for a group of players, (normally between 2 to 10 players), with a single instrument to a part.

Classified by the number of players, chamber music is categorised into duo - two players, trio - three players, quartet – four players, quintet – five players, sextet – six players, septet – seven players, octet – eight players and nonet - nine players.

Beyond this, it is generally known as a chamber orchestra.

Notes on Francis Poulenc's Sextet for Wind Quintet & Piano
An Overview of Chamber Music History
10 Essential Chamber Music to Know